50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know… Week 8

WEEK 8

“MAKING AN APOLOGY”

YOU DO:

Say “I’m sorry” without adding a “but”.

YOU DON’T:

Say, “I’m sorry I knocked into the table and broke your favorite piece of pottery, but you should have put it on a higher shelf if you liked it so much.”  You day say, “I’m sorry I didn’t include you with the others, but I was in a hurry.”  You don’t say, “I’m sorry I forgot to let the dog out, but I wanted to watch the end of the show and he should have let me know he needed to go out.”

WHY:

Adding an excuse to what you did or didn’t do means you are not taking responsibility for your actions, and that makes your apology pretty worthless.

YOU DO:

Say I’m sorry and_____” if you need to say more than “I’m Sorry” to make the situation right.  “I’m sorry I was careless and broke the bowl.  Can I help buy a new one?”

YOU DON’T:

Assume that “I’m sorry” is always enough to make amends.
WHY:

Because sometimes you need to back your words up with action.

  • A lady doesn’t delay her apology hoping the situation will just go away.  It won’t, and the sooner you say “I’m sorry,” the sooner everyone feels better.
  • A lady doesn’t expect to be rewarded for saying “I’m Sorry” but is grateful when her apology is graciously accepted.
  • A lady doesn’t assume an apology is the end of the situation, but she understands it’s the first step toward making things right.
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50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know… Week 7

WEEK 7

“ACCEPTING A COMPLIMENT”

YOU DO:

Say “thank you” when your friend tells you how cute your hair looks in a ponytail.

YOU DON’T:

Say, “That’s because I haven’t washed it in four days!”

WHY:

No needs to know your personal hygiene habits, and the appropriate response is “thank you.”

YOU DO:

Say “Thank you” when your teacher tells you proud she is of your effort on your personal essay.

YOU DON’T:

Say, “Really?  I wrote it on the bus on the way to school this morning.”

WHY:

Even if you did get away with such little effort on that assignment, do you really want to make your teacher feel foolish?  The appropriate response is “thank you.”

YOU DO:

Say “thank you” when your mother’s friend tell you how much she likes your charcoal sketch in the school art show.

YOU DON’T:

Say, “That Piece?  It’s not very good.”

WHY:

When someone compliments your accomplishments, it is rude to suggest that they have no idea what they’re talking about.  Even if in your heart you believe you could have done better, the appropriate response is “thank you.”

 

  • A lady knows that accepting a compliment graciously is as important as giving a compliment sincerely, and she endeavors to do both.

50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know… Week 6

Week 6….

“Paying A Compliment”

YOU DO:

Tell someone when you think she or he has done something really well, or when she looks really pretty, or when his jacket is really cool.

YOU DON’T:

Keep those thoughts to yourself, even if you’re shy or don’t know the person that well.  The opportunity will pass, and then you’ll wish you had taken it.

WHY: 

It is never wrong or incorrect say something nice to someone.

YOU DO:

Pay compliments with sincerity and only when you mean it.

YOU DON’T:

Say something nice just to have something to say.

WHY:

If you tell your friend every time you see her that she looks fantastic, she’s to stop believing you.  Nobody, not even a supermodel, looks fantastic all the time.

 

  • A lady is not stingy with her compliments.
  • A lady does not exaggerate her compliments.
  • A lady is genuine in her compliments.

50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know…Week 5

WEEK 5…..

MAKING INTRODUCTIONS

YOU DO:

Include something personal about a friend you are introducing to your parents like “Mom this is Tiffany. She moved here from Germany last year.”

YOU DON’T:

Just say “Mom, this is Tiffany.”

Why:

Because knowing a little something about your friend gives your parents an opening to get to know your friend a little better, which is reassuring for parents.

YOU DO:

Introduce a newcomer to a group of people she/he doesn’t know, even if you don’t know everyone’s name in the group. You can simply say, “Everyone this is Carrie. We went to elementary school together.

YOU DON’T:

Say hello to the newcomer, then resume your conversation with your other friends.

Why:

Not being introduced makes a person feel invisible and unimportant, and no one wants to make anyone feel that way.

  • A lady always introduces the younger person to the older person. “Grandma, this is Elizabeth.” Not, “Elizabeth, this is my grandmother.”
  • A lady can introduce herself to someone by saying her own name first. “Hello I’m Jana Jones.” Ideally, the other person will reply, “Hello, I’m Hannah Rogers.”

What Challenges Have You Set For This Year?

What Challenges have you set for yourself this year?

Definition of Challenge: a call to take part in a contest or competition, especially a duel.

When I think of challenge I don’t really think of competition with others all the time. Some times outs about you and competing to see if you complete a task or just do better than the time you did before.

I find myself doing a number of challenges. Some shorter than others, but most of them were yearly. I do tend to break some of them down to monthly to smaller goals to help me reach my larger goal.

Here are some of my challenges for the year.

  • Reading Challenge 📚. It’s my goal to read a minimum of 25 books. Previously I tried 52. However withmy increased schedule load I had to think realistically. So 25 it is.
  • 365 Photo Challenge. I love this one. I haven’t tried in a while, but wanted to get back into it.
  • 12 Habits. I actually got this denim my planner. Each month I should be working on a new habit.
  • 45,000-50,000 steps a week. This can get tough if I’m not working, but I’m planning to add walking in.

These are four of my challenges this year. Have you challenged yourself this year? What are they?

50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know…Week 4

WEEK 4

“BEING INTRODUCED”

YOU DO:

Repeat the person’s name to whom you are being introduced.

YOU DON’T:

Just say “hello” and think that covers it.

WHY:
Repeating a person’s name back helps you remember their name for future reference, an invaluable asset.

YOU DO:

Stop what you are doing when you are being introduced.

YOU DON’T:

Simply wave the hot dog you’re eating at the ball game toward the person you’re being introduced to.

WHY:

If someone thinks enough of you to introduce you to someone else, don’t embarrass everyone — especially yourself– by acting as if you couldn’t be bothered.

  • A Lady smiles and makes eye contact with the person she is being introduced to.
  • A lady remembers that first impressions are lasting impressions.
  • If the person making introductions has somehow forgotten your name, a lady comes to the rescue by offering it herself.  “Hello, I’m Mandy” is all that is needed to save the situation.

50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know…Week 3

WEEK 3:

SAYING “EXCUSE ME”

YOU DO:

Say “excuse me” if you have to walk through the middle of a line of people at the concession stand.

YOU DON’T:

Scoot through when you see an opening as if no one will notice.

WHY:

People waiting in line can be very protective of their spots but will be happy to step back if they know your intention is not to butt in.

YOU DO:

Say “excuse me?” if you haven’t heard what someone has said to you would like them to repeat it.

YOU DON’T:

Say “huh?”

WHY:

“Huh” sounds as if you are grunting, and young ladies don’t grunt unless they are moving heavy objects or involved in an athletic endeavor.

YOU DO:

Say “excuse me” if you need to interrupt someone, even if it’s your own mom on the computer or your dad reading a book.

YOU DON’T:

Fidget, wave your arms around, or sigh dramatically.

WHY:

Because saying “excuse me” is a perfectly acceptable way to get someone’s attention.

 

  • A lady always says “excuse me” to get someone’s attention, not “hey” or “um”.
  • A lady says “excuse me” when passing in front of someone’s line of vision, whether that’s in front of the lipstick display at the pharmacy or a painting in a museum.

Total Knee Replacement…Final Chapter

Well, here I am, in my final chapter of my Total Knee Replacement. Well not final, final chapter. As I stated before, it takes a solid year to completely heal from this. As it stands, I returned to December fourth. Was I ready? Physically, yes I think so. My doctor thinks so. Mentally, don’t think I was.

On my last visit he tested my leg by bending it, stretching it straight out and the strength by having me do a squat and a one legged squat. Yes, that one legged squat hurt. I was a touch stiff as it was early in the morning and hadn’t completed my exercises that morning yet. He did tell me to to focus on those squats and lunges for strengthening my quads. So for the past month and half that’s what I’ve been working on. I’ve increased my steps. I haven’t done much walking due to the weather here. However, I’ve done some light workout inside on the Wii and Xbox.

The one thing I am still having slight issues with is my energy level. When I first went back to work I got winded after 15 minutes of a light workout. Needless to say, going back to work was tough. It’s great that I have some great co-workers and an understanding supervisor.

After a month and half of being back at work I’ve noticed my energy level is doing better. Some days I struggle, but overall, it’s better. I have almost no pain when I’m working and moving. I have some pain sometimes at night. I’m still working on strengthening my quads everyday. My knee only buckles when I’m extremely tired.

Overall I’m satisfied with the results. I don’t struggle through pain just to make through the day with tons of pain medicine. Do I recommend getting the surgery? If it is needed and there are not any other options, then, yes, I do recommend having the surgery.

Thank you for following me through this journey.

50 Things Every Young Lady Should Know…Week 2

Week 2….

SAY “THANK YOU”

YOU DO:
Say “thank you” anytime someone does something nice for you, no matter how well you know them.

YOU DON’T:
Think you don’t have to say “thank you’ to your mom, your dad, or your big sister because they are family and don’t count.

WHY:
Because family is where good manners begin, not where they end.

YOU DO:
Say “thank you” when a teacher compliments your drawing, or the piano teacher remarks kindly on your playing, even if you’e not happy with your drawing or your performance.

YOU DON’T:
Reply “it’s ugly!” or “I was terrible!” even if you could have done better.

WHY:
Because rejecting someone’s kind comments on your accomplishment implies they have no taste, and that’s insulting.

YOU DO:
Say “thank you” to the person who just made your strawberry-banana smoothie, handed you your change at the market, or gave you a program at hockey game.

YOU DON’T:
Assume that because people are “doing their jobs: they don’t deserve to be thanked for that particular interaction with you.

WHY:
Because it makes people feel good to know their efforts are appreciated, and why wouldn’t you want to make someone feel good?

  • A lady smiles and makes eye contact when she says “thank you.”
  • A lady says “thank you” even when the person she is thanking is on the other end of the phone.
  • A lady says “thank you” even if no one else has – or especially if no one else has done so.